All posts by lbaker57

In the dark

Not to get too heavy on ya, but I really think that was a BIG part of what the cultural revolution was about— exposing the truth— stop hiding

The talk show came around in the late 70s—Oprah and Phil Donahue— omg, what a revolution there, too.

 

Back in the olden days, when cities had walls, they could throw you out of the city and not let you back in if they wanted to.  Then you would wander on very dangerous roads to the next city and maybe or maybe not they would let in a stranger.  Them was tough times.  So, a lot of pressure to hide whatever was going on behind the walls of your home if you could.  A lot of fear.

And it was dark.  No electricity.  Really dark, like can’t see your hand in front of your face, dark.  Can you imagine?

And banks are relatively new.  I didn’t know that.  You borrowed money from the rich guy in town, based on your reputation and your family name.  So if your reputation was damaged no one would lend you money.

These are just discoveries I’ve made in the past few years that made me understand why we put on airs, and fake stuff and hide stuff and don’t tell our neighbors what is going on and try to conform—fear being different.

 

Thanks for listening.  See, I have to get all this stuff outa my head.  You don’t have to read it, though.  I’m doing it for my own sanity, now.  Cuz nobody wants to hear my ideas.  Or if I share information like that, the room goes silent.  I really know how to kill a party, let me tell ya.  It’s all so whack and out of context and random.  But these are the things I think about.

 

Have fun at the gym.

Collecting Words and Sentences

The Daily Post

My college roommate and I used to collect quotes for one another. We’d write inspirational words down on Post-its and keep files where we regularly stored our favorite messages that we’d stumbled across. We both agreed: words are powerful.

When someone expresses an observation that we identify with, a sense of validation and synchronicity arises within us. We’re reminded that we’re not alone, that someone, somewhere else in the world, has discovered the same truth that we’re living or perhaps arrived at a conclusion we needed to hear ourselves.

Make your own Bible. Select and collect all the words and sentences that in all your readings have been to you like the blast of a trumpet.
-Ralph Waldo Emerson

I came across the quote above from a fellow quote-collector, journaler, and generally uplifting blogger, Gala Darling. In her “30 Days of Radical Self-Love Letters,” she talks about starting a…

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The Good News Is…

loisbakerblog_teatime09132016

 

I scanned this from my Equal Exchange Fairly Traded Organic Chai Small Farmers Big Change tea packaging.  It is a picture of a brown person ‘slaving’ and i don’t know why that is in quotes because working on a plantation in modern day is still slavery, slaving away picking tea on a tea plantation.  I was so encouraged to learn that this woman is toiling now under a new model, a co-operative, so she gets to share in the profits from her labor.

OK.  So why do i write today?  Because we can say, THANK YOU, for the plantation.  Not the brutal, violent, exploitative, arrogant, elitist, capitalist, system that brought the tea plantation to us, but now that it’s there, well, now we have the field cultivated and the system in place to grow, market, sell, and distribute the crop.  Thank you Queen Victoria.

no, that is going too far.  but, oh…. what DO i mean?  Turning poison into medicine.

Take WalMart.  WalMart is ‘everything wrong with America’ as was stated by a good friend of mine.  It turned supply-side economics on its head.  Now instead of a manufacturer saying, this is how much it costs me to make this product.  I will sell it to you for $x amount.  Walmart said, this is how much we will pay you to make this product.  And if you can’t make it that cheaply then we will buy it someplace else.  We own you.   It caused good manufacturing jobs to be shipped overseas where there are no labor unions, no environmental regulations, no OSHA, no paid leave, no workmen’s comp, no child labor laws, no 40-hour work week.  All those people wanted jobs though and now they’re part of the machine…. but i digress.  Not only that, it put mom and pop stores out of business, destroyed our small towns, and flooded our homes with cheap ‘stuff.’

So, now what?  Don’t shop at Walmart.  OK.  Don’t shop at Walmart.  Good for you.  But the truth is, we lost that war.  Walmart has been here for 20 years (30?) and it is not going anywhere.  What’s next?  Well, the good news is, if WalMart decides to change one thing, then the change ripples through the whole globe.  Good things can happen as well as bad.  For example, they decided to reduce waste in packaging.  That has an enormous impact on our landfills.  If they decide to raise wages and benefits, then millions of employees benefit.  If they decide to sell locally grown organic produce, then organic farmers will benefit.

Insight Dialogue

I never thought of this.

“The Basics of moral communication are straight forward:  abstaining from lying, from divisive speech, from abusive speech and from idle chatter.  Speech should also be true, useful, spoken at the proper time, and spoken with lovingkindness.”

I never thought of “Moral Communication.”  In other words, to speak lies, to talk down to someone, to intimidate someone with your speech, to manipulate someone by what you say… is IMMORAL.

The three moral components of Buddhism’s eightfold path–wise speech, wise action, and wise living.  Unwise speech, therefore, is immoral.  It really makes me reconsider what comes out of my mouth!

This is taken from Insight Dialogue.  It was in my files.  I think i got it from the sangha group at the Unitarian church in Iowa City.  It’s come at the right time.

Alone in my room i am the most enlightened, knowledgeable wonderful person.  But put me with another human being or a group of human beings and….. well, it all breaks down.

Insight Dialogue is an interpersonal meditatin practice, bringing mindfulness and tranquility of silent meditation directly into our experience with other people.

…. suffering has interpersonal components:  separation from people you love, being with people who irritate you, unsatisfied longings.  Interpersonal suffering is an important aspect of all suffering.  The hungers for pleasure in relationships, to be seen or admired by others, and to hide or escape– these are all causes of suffering, which is then sustained by confusion and habit.

Release from interpsersonal suffering is possible…

Good stuff, eh?  If the quality of your life is based on the quality of your relationships.  And if you, like me, suffer from social anxiety or any kind of anxiety.  If fulfilling relationships elude you, then, this instruction into and Insight Dialogue practice might be useful.

 

I Love This.

My college roommate and I used to collect quotes for one another. We’d write inspirational words down on Post-its and keep files where we regularly stored our favorite messages that we’d stumbled across. We both agreed: words are powerful.

When someone expresses an observation that we identify with, a sense of validation and synchronicity arises within us. We’re reminded that we’re not alone, that someone, somewhere else in the world, has discovered the same truth that we’re living or perhaps arrived at a conclusion we needed to hear ourselves.

Make your own Bible. Select and collect all the words and sentences that in all your readings have been to you like the blast of a trumpet.
-Ralph Waldo Emerson

I came across the quote above from a fellow quote-collector, journaler, and generally uplifting blogger, Gala Darling. In her “30 Days of Radical Self-Love Letters,” she talks about starting a radical self-love journal where you can store all of the things that make you happy. Since I came across this quote, I’ve noticed my own journaling has changed quite a bit in turn. It’s filled less with my own internal ramblings, and more with words, images, and conversations that I find uplifting.

In short, it’s turning into my own “bible.”